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SALLUSTII CATILINA

CHAPTER 24

Chapter 1 ||| Chapter 2 ||| Chapter 3 ||| Chapter 4 ||| Chapter 5 ||| Chapter 6 ||| Chapter 7 ||| Chapter 8 ||| Chapter 9 ||| Chapter 10
Chapter 11 ||| Chapter 12 ||| Chapter 13 ||| Chapter 14 ||| Chapter 15 ||| Chapter 16 ||| Chapter 17 ||| Chapter 18 ||| Chapter 19 ||| Chapter 20
Chapter 21 ||| Chapter 22 ||| Chapter 23 ||| Chapter 24 ||| Chapter 25 ||| Chapter 26 ||| ||| ||| |||



Sed postquam Antonius adventabat cum exercitu, Catilina

But after-that Antony did approach with an army, Catiline

.

facere iter per montes: modo

(began) to make (his) march through (over) the mountains: now

.

movere castra ad urbem, modo versus in Galliam;

to move (his) camps to the city, now towards into Gaul;

.

non dare occasionem pugnandi hostibus.

not to give [he did not give an] opportunity of fighting to the enemies

.

Sperabat se habiturum propediem magnas copias,

He did hope himself about-to-have shortly great forces,

.

si socii patravissent incepta Romae.

if (his) companions might have executed (their) undertakings at Rome.

.

Interea, fretus opibus conjurationis, repudiabat

Meantime, relying to (on) the reoources of the conspiracy, he did reject

.

servitia, cujus magnae copiae concurrebant

slaves of which great forces (numbers) did run-together

.

ad eum initio; simul videri

to him in the beginning; at-the-same-time (thinking it) to seem

.

alienum suis rationibus, communieaase causam civium

foreign to his purposes, to have shared the cause of citizens

.

cum fugitivis servis. Sed postquam nuncius pervenit

with fugitive slaves. But after-that a messenger arrived

.

in castra, conjurationem patefactam

into the camps, [that] the conspiracy (to be) is laid-open [was discovered]

.

Romae ; supplicium sumptum de

at Rome; [that] punishment [was] taken of (on)

.

Lentulo et Cethego, que caeteris, quos memoravi

Leotulus and Cethegus, and the others, whom I have mentioned

.

supra; plerique, quos spes rapinarum, aut studium

above; many, whom the hope of rapines, or zeal

.

novarum rerum, illexerat, dilabuntur: Catilina

of new things (change), had allured, slip-away, Catiline

.

abducit reliquos, magnis itineribus per asperos

leads-off the rest, by great marches through rugged

.

montis (montes), in Pistoriensem agrum, eo consilio,

mountains, into the Pistorian land, with this design,

.

uti profugeret occulte per tramites in Galliam. At

that he might escape secretly by by-ways into Gaul. But

.

Quintus Metellus Celer existumans Catilinam, ex

Quintus Metellus Celer thinking Catiline, from

.

difficultate rerum, agitare illa

the difficulty of things (his circumstances), to agitate (project) those

.

eadem, quae diximus supra, praesidebat cum

same (things), which we have said above, did preside with

.

tribus legionibus in Piceno agro. Igitur, ubi

three legions in the Picene land, Therefore, when

.

cognovit iter ejus ex perfugis, movit

be knew [the direction or] the march or him from deserters, he moved

.

castra propere, ac consedit sub radicibus ipsis

camps hastily, and encamped under the roota themselves

.

montium, qull descensus erat illi

(at the foot) or the mountains, where a descent was to him (Catiline

.

properanti in Galliam. Neque tamen Antonius aberat

hastening into Gaul. Neither however Antony was distant

.

longe, utpote qui sequeretur magno exercitu

far, as (one) who might (did) follow with a great army

.

expeditos in fugam

the disencumbered (those light armed) into flight (for retreat)

.

aequloribus locis. Sed Catilina, postquam vidit sese

in more-level places, But Catiline, after-that be saw himself

.

clausum montibus atque copiis hostium, res adversas

enclosed by mountalns and the forces of the enemies, things adverse

.

in urbe, neque ullam spem fugae, neque praesidii,

In the city, neither any hope of flight, nor of protection

.

ratus optumum factu

[of succour], having deemed (it) the best [thing] to be done [he could do]

.

tentare fortunam belli in tali re,

to try the tortune of war in such a thing (crisis),

.

statuit confligere Antonio quam-primum.

reaolved to engage to (with) Antony as-first (as soon as possible)

.

Itaque concione advocata, habuit

Therefore an assembly having been called, he (delivered)

.

orationem hujuscemodi:

a speech of this-kind:

.

"Ego habeo compertum, milites! verba.

"I have (it) found, soldiers I [that] words [do]

.

non addere virtutem viris; neque exercitum

not to add (give) valour to men; neither [is] an army

.

fieri strenuum ex ignavo, neque fortem

to be made vigorous from (being) indolent, nor brave

.

ex timido, oratione imperatoris. Quanta andacia

from fearful, by the speech of a general. How-much courage

.

inest animo cujusque, natura aut moribus,

is-in to the mind of every-one, by nature or by dispositions,

.

tanta solet patere in bello. Nequicquam

so-much is-wont to lie-open (be displayed) in war. In-vain

.

hortere, quem neque gloria neque pericula

you may exhort (him), whom neither glory nor dangers

.

excitant: timor animi officit auribus. Sed ego

excite" cowardice of mind obstructs to (his) ears, But I

.

advoeavi vos, quo monerem pauca,

have assembled you, so-order-that I might advise a few (things),

.

simul, uti aperirem causam mei consilii

at-the-same-time, that I might disclose the cause of my design.

.

Milites, scitis quantam cladem socordia atque

Soldiers, you know how-great a defeat the slothfulness and

.

ignavia Lentuli attulerit ipsi que

indolence of Lentulus may have brought (has brought) to himself and

.

nobis, que quo modo, dum opperior praesidia

to us, and in what manner, while I am-waiting-for reinforcements

.

ex urbe, nequiverim (perf. sub.) proficisci

out-of the city, I may have been-unable (I have been unable) to set-out

.

in Galliam. Vero nunc omnes intelligitis juxta

into Gaul, But now (you) all understand equally

.

mecum in quo loco nostrae res sint. Duo

with me in what situation our things may be (are), Two

.

exercitus hostium, unus ab urbe, alter a Gallia.

armies of enemies, one from the clty, the other from Gaul

.

obstant: egestas frumenti atque aliarum rerum

oppose (us): the want of corn and or other things

.

prohibet esse diutius in his locis, si animus

prevents (us) to be longer in these places, if (our) mind

.

maxume-ferat, Iter

may chiefly-bear (incline). A way [Even if our minds incline us that way.]

.

est aperiundum ferro, quocunque placet ire.

is to-be-opened by the sword, wheresoever it pleases (us) to go

.

Quapropter moneo vos, uti sitis forti atque parato

Therefore I advise you, that you may be with brave and prepared

.

animo, et memineritis, cum inibitis praelium,

mind, and will have remembered, when you will enter the battle,

.

vos portare divitias, decus, gloriam,

you to carry (that you carry) riches, honour, glory.

.

praeterea libertatem atque patriam, In vestris dextris.

besides liberty and country, so your right (hands).

.

Si vincimus, omnia erunt tuta nobis;

If we conquer, all (things) shall be safe to us;

.

commeatus abunde, municipia et coloniae patebunt.

provisions abundantly, municipal-towns and colonies will be-open.


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