archeus

SALLUSTII CATILINA

CHAPTER 22

Chapter 1 ||| Chapter 2 ||| Chapter 3 ||| Chapter 4 ||| Chapter 5 ||| Chapter 6 ||| Chapter 7 ||| Chapter 8 ||| Chapter 9 ||| Chapter 10
Chapter 11 ||| Chapter 12 ||| Chapter 13 ||| Chapter 14 ||| Chapter 15 ||| Chapter 16 ||| Chapter 17 ||| Chapter 18 ||| Chapter 19 ||| Chapter 20
Chapter 21 ||| Chapter 22 ||| Chapter 23 ||| Chapter 24 ||| Chapter 25 ||| Chapter 26 ||| ||| ||| |||



Nae ista mansuetudo et misericordia vertet in

Truly that mildness and mercy will turn into

.

miseriam vobis, si illi ceperint arma. Soilicet,

ruin to you, if they shall have taken arms. Forsooth

.

res ipsa est aspera, sed vos timetis non

the thing itself is harsh [dangerous], but you fear not

.

eam! Immo, vero maxume; sed expectantes, alius alium,

It! Nay, Indeed very-much, but awaiting, one another,

.

cunctemini inertia et mollitia. animi,

you hesitate from indolence and effeminacy of mind.

.

videlicet confisi immortalibus diis, qui saepe servavere

Indeed trusting to the immortal gods, who often have preserved

.

hanc rempublicam in maxumis periculis. Auxilia

this republic in the greatest dangers. The help

.

deorum parantur non votis, neque muliebribus

of the gods are procured not by vows, nor womanish

.

suppliciis; omnia cedunt prospere vigi­lando,

supplications; all (things) yieId (ooour) prosperously by watching,

.

agendo, consulendo bene. Implores

by acting, by consulting, well. You may implore

.

deos nequicquam, ubi tradideris (perf. sub.)

the gods in-vain, when you may have delivered

.

to socordiae atque ignaviae: sunt

you to heartlessness (slothfulness) and indolence: they are

.

irati que infesti. Apud nostros majores Aulus

angry and hostile. Among our ancestors Aulus

.

Manlius Torquatus jussit filium necari

Manlius Torquatus ordered (his) son to be put-to-death

.

Gallico bello, quod is pugnaverat in hostem

in the Gallio war, because he had fought against an enemy

.

contra imperium: atque ille egregius adolescens dedit

againet order: and that excellent young-man gave

.

poenas morte immoderatae fortitudinis.

(suffered) punishments by death of (for his) excessive bravery

.

Vos-cunctamini, quid statuatis de crudelissumis

Do you-hesitate, what you may resolve concerning the most-cruel

.

parricidis? Videlicet caetera vita eorum obstat

parricides? Indeed the rest (former) life of them opposes (excuses)

.

huic sceleri! Verum parcite dignitati Lentuli,

to this wickedness! But spare to the dignity of Lentulus,

.

si ipse pepercit unquam pudicitiae, si suae famae,

if he has spared ever to chastity, if to his-own character,

.

si ullis diis aut hominibus. Ignoscite adolescentiae

If to any gods or to men. Pardon to the youth

.

Cethegi, nisi fecit jam iterum bellum

of Cethegus, unless he has made already again war (against his)

.

patriae. Nam quid ego-loquar de Gabinio, Statilio,

country. For what shall-I-speak of Gabinius, Statilio,

.

Caepario, quibus si quidquam pensi fuisset

Caeparius, to whom if any of consideration might have been

.

(plup. sub.) unquam, habuissent non

(had been) ever, they might have held not (had not held)

.

ea consilia de republica ?

those counsels concerning the republic? [Who if they ever had any

recollection, would not have entertained those designs against the republic.]

.

Postremo, conscripti patres, si locus esset

Lastly, conscript fathers, if place might be (if there were room)

.

peccato, mehercule, facile-paterer vos corrigi

for error, [by Hercules,] I would easily suffer you to be corrected

.

re ipsa, quoniam contemnitis verba. Sed

by the thing itself, since you despise words. But

.

sumus circumventi undique: Catilina urget

we are beset on-every-side: Catline presses to (our)

.

faucibus cum exercitu: alii hostes sunt intra

jaws (closely) with an army: other enemies are within

.

moenis, atque in sinu urbis. Neque potest

the walls, and in the bosom of the city. Neither can

.

quidquam parari neque consuli occulte: quo

any (thing) be prepared nor be consulted secretly: therefore

.

est properandum magis.

it is to-be-hastened the more. [Therefore speedy action is required.]

.

Quare ego ita censeo. Cum respublica venerit

Therefore I thus determine. Since the republic may have come (has come)

.

(per. sub.) in maxuma pericula nefario consilio

into the greatest dangers by the horrible counsels

.

sceleratorum civium; que hi convicti-sint (perf. sub.)

of wicked citizens; and these may have been convicted by the

.

indicio Titi Vulturcii, et legatorum Allobrogum,

information of Titus Vuturcius, and of the ambassadors of the Allobroges,

.

que confessi-(sint) (perf. sub.) paravisse

and may have confessed to have prepared

.

caedem, incendia, que alia foeda atque crudelia

murder, burnings, and other abominable and cruel

.

facinora in civis (cives) que patriam;

crimes against (their) citizens and ceountry; (that)

.

supplicium sumendum, more majorum, de

punishment be-taken, by the custom of (our) ancestors, of (on those)

.

confessis, sicuti de manifestis

having confessed, as of (those) manifest (clearly convicted)

.

capitalium rerum."

of capital things (crimes)."

.

Postquam Cato assedit, omnes consulares,

Alter Cato sat-down, all the consular (men),

.

que item magna pars senatas, landant sententiam

and also a great part of the senate, praise the opinion

.

ejus; ferunt virtutem animi ad coelum:

of him; bear (extol) the virtue of (his) mind to heaven:

.

alii increpantes vocant alios timidos: Cato habetur

others chiding call others fearful: Cato is had

.

clarus atque magnus: decretum senati

(accounted) renowned and great: a decree of the senate

.

fit, sicut ille censuerat. Sed forte lubuit

is made, as he had determined. But by chance it has pleased

.

mihi, legenti multa, andienti multa praeclars facinora,

to me, reading many, hearing many illustrious exploits,

.

quae Romanus populus fecit domi que militiae,

which the Roman people has done at-home and at war

.

mari atque terra, attendere, quae res

(abroad), by sea and by land, to consider, what thing

.

sustinuisset maxume tanta negotia. Sciebam

might have sustained chiefly so-great affair. I did know (them)

.

saepenumero contendisse parva manu cum

oftentimes to have contended with a small band with

.

magnis legionibus hostium: cognoveram bella gesta

great legions of enemies: I have known wars carried-on [by them]

.

parvis copiis cum opulentis regibus:

with small forces with opulent (powerful) kings:

.

ad hoc saepe toleravisse

add to this [that they] often to have borne [have sustained]

.

violentiam fortunae: Graecos fuisse ante

the violence of fortune: [that] the Greeks to have been [were] before

.

Romanos facundia, Gallos gloria belli. Ac

the Romans in eloquence, the Gauls in the glory of war. And

.

constabat mihi, agitanti multa egregiam

it was evident to me, discussing many (things), [that] the singular

.

virtutem paucorum civium patravisse cuncta;

virtue of a few citizen to have performed [performed] all (things);

.

que factum eo, uti paupertas

and (it was) done (came to pass) by that, that poverty

.

superaret (imp. sub.) divitias, paucitas multitudinem.

might overcome (overcame) riches, fewness multitude.


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